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Using Gamepad on Autonomous Post-Initialization (Pre-Randomization)

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  • Using Gamepad on Autonomous Post-Initialization (Pre-Randomization)

    The name pretty much explains the concept, and it's obvious why this could be an interesting question.

    Our specific use-case is an Autonomous mode that loads other programs, which can be selected by using the D-Pad. If we had a separate Autonomous OpMode for every WIP program, it would get unwieldy quickly, not to mention it would be tedious to set up all of those OpModes.

    The pertinent rules from Ultimate Goal (last year) seem to be:
    The Robot is set up on the Playing Field with the following required constraints:
    ...
    4) Op Mode – The Drive Team uses their Driver Station Android device to select an Op Mode. Pressing
    the Driver Station Init button is not required unless it is needed for the Robot to satisfy the Match start
    size constraint.

    ...

    Once the Match Manager gives the set-up complete signal:
    1) ...
    2) The Drive Team may not touch their Driver Station or controllers until the Autonomous Period has
    ended, except to initialize and/or start their Autonomous program using the Driver Station Android
    device screen. A Robot that requires Autonomous program initialization to satisfy the Robot starting
    size constraint must be initialized before Match Manager gives the set-up complete signal.

    This current rule seems to allow extra initialization steps before the "set-up complete signal." My question is if I am correct in my assessment, and when the set-up complete signal actually happens. Could someone help with that?

  • #2
    You are correct in your interpretation.

    The team I coach often has just one Autonomous opmode, and then after init, but before the refs signal that it's time to randomize the field, they select various things. Like if they are Red or Blue autonomous, which starting position they are in, how many seconds delay they want (to allow alliance partner to clear out first), etc.

    This kind of setup is not uncommon for the more advanced teams that realize there are just too many combinations of possibilities to have unique opmodes for each one of them.

    It does require the team to pay more attention to the field personnel so they are done making their selections before it is time to randomize the field. (i.e. the "setup complete signal") otherwise they may not have made one of their choices and they just have to run with what they have.

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    • #3
      Thank you!

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